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Jonathan's Jungle Roadshow News 2016

Monday 19th December 2016  Just a quick reminder that my current competition is still running and will be for just a couple more weeks!   I am looking for some fantastic name suggestions for my newest arrivals, a beautiful pair of tiny baby Mexican black king snakes:

I have already had many fantastic suggestions for names for these snakes but I will be taking suggestions right up until the end of the competition on Friday 13th January 2017!

 

I'm looking for brilliantly original names which might possibly be based in some way on their jet black appearance, their country of origin (Mexico), the fact that they are a future pairing or whatever else you can come up with!  In the past I have been bowled over by the response to my naming competitions and the incredibly diverse suggestions people young and old have come up with! For more information on the competition prize and for terms & conditions please click here.

Friday 9th September 2016 Apologies for the lack of updates in recent weeks, I have had a very busy summer! This included an absolutely amazing three weeks in Kenya with my family, a holiday we have been planning and saving for many years to finally do, including an incredible week on safari and ten days at a beautiful Mombasa beach resort. There were SO many animal highlights (big and small and underwater!) that it would be impossible to share even a tiny fraction of them here, but I have just added a few of my favourite photographs below:

On our arrival home from Kenya I was delighted to discover a couple of recently matured male Haaniella saussurei stick insects which I bred here myself - these are one of my favourite species because of their amazing spiny appearance!

Sunday 10th July 2016 In recent days one of my smallest tarantulas has moulted, and this one is quite significant! When I bought this one it only had seven legs, so I named it Seven! Following the last two moults though it has grown back its formerly missing leg, and now you would never know it was ever missing! Here (s)he is when I first bought him/her, with its rear left leg completely missing:

Here (s)he is following the first moult just six weeks later with a regrown leg, but one that is significantly thinner than the other seven:

Here is Seven just another six weeks later, with a completely regrown rear left leg which is almost completely indistinguishable from her other seven legs!

Friday 18th June 2016 I have recently acquired two new Honduran curly hair tarantulas, but they are VERY different sizes!! One is a tiny baby (or spiderling) and the other is a subadult female (so not even fully grown yet), but they are quite markedly different in size as you can see here!

Friday 27th May 2016  I have acquired a few new species of animal since my last update. First up is a fantastic scorpion known as the flat rock scorpion, which in the wild is found in Southern Africa. This species has a distinctively flattened body so that it can hide itself in small rock crevices:

Next up is a new species of millipede, known as the Florida ivory millipede:

Finally this is an amazing species of praying mantis known as Gongylus gongylodes aka the wandering violin mantis due to its exceptionally long prothorax giving it the appearance of a violin!

Monday 9th May 2016 Since my last update I have acquired a couple of new baby Mossy New Caledonian geckos which are always absolutely gorgeous!

Tuesday 26th April 2016 Yesterday was the fifth birthday of Tiny, my beautiful New Caledonian giant gecko! She is absolutely beautiful and at 200g+ she is three times as heavy as the next largest gecko in my collection!

New Caledonian giant gecko

Sunday 17th April 2016  Here are Miss Lowden and Mrs Parry, two of the lovely teachers at Cupernham Infant School, enjoying meeting Homer my Australian woma python during my annual visit to their Year 1 classes linked to their Australia topic!

Monday 11th April 2016  These are some brand new katydids to my collection of a species known as Cnemidophyllum citrifolium from South America.  They are exceptionally beautiful as you can see here!

Sunday 27th March 2016 My beautiful adult female Antilles pink toe tarantula Naomi moulted since my last update here! Here she is, freshly moulted and looking absolutely gorgeous (although these pictures do not do her justice at all):

Antilles pink toe tarantula aka Avicularia versicolor
Antilles pink toe tarantula aka Avicularia versicolor
Antilles pink toe tarantula aka Avicularia versicolor

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I have had more than 100 Peruvian horsehead grashoppers hatch in recent weeks and they are all growing extremely quickly!  Here are just a couple of them (male top and female below), they really are one of the coolest insect species on the planet!

Peruvian horsehead grasshopper aka Pseudoproscopia latirostris
Peruvian horsehead grasshopper aka Pseudoproscopia latirostris

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Thursday 25th February 2016 My gorgeous Honduran curly hair tarantula moulted to maturity in recent days and he is looking absolutely fantastic as you can see below!

Honduran curly hair tarantula aka Brachypelma albopilosum
Honduran curly hair tarantula aka Brachypelma albopilosum

You can clearly see from the picture below why this species is known as the 'curly hair' tarantula!

Honduran curly hair tarantula aka Brachypelma albopilosum

He is an exceptionally docile tarantula and I am really looking forward to introducing him to children at schools and other event in the coming weeks! For more information about this wonderful species please click here.

 

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Monday 4th January 2016 A very Happy New Year everyone! I trust that you've all had a fabulous festive season and start to 2016.  I have some nice animal news from the festive season to share with you all here.  First of all, on Christmas Day itself, I had a big hatch of baby Peruvian horsehead grasshoppers! There are well over 30 and they are exceptionally tiny as you can see here, with one of the tiny nymphs on my fingertip:

Horsehead grasshopper nymph Pseudoproscopia latirostris
Horsehead grasshopper nymph Pseudoproscopia latirostris

Next up is the news that I've been able to confirm the gender of the larger giant tailless whip scorpion (Euphrynichus amanica) which I received at the end of November (and as reported on Nov 25th 2015 below).  It wasn't clear which gender this single individual was (it's much easier to tell the sexes apart when they are together!) but shortly before Christmas I found that the underside of her abdomen was covered in eggs!

Gravid Euphrynichus amanica aka giant tailless whip scorpion

Whilst she hasn't been living with a male during her short time in my collection she was previously housed in a mixed-gender communal group, so there is every chance that these eggs will actually be fertile.  I am very hopeful that they will prove to be as there is nothing cuter than baby tailless whip scorpions!  You will already know this if you have seen pictures of  the many hundreds of  baby Damon diadema  (the other species of tailless whip scorpions I have been keeping and breeding for years) which I have produced here. If you haven't ever seen them please click here!  Watch this space for news on these eggs...

Gravid Euphrynichus amanica aka giant tailless whip scorpion

The next news is that BOTH of my beautiful Mexican red knee tarantulas moulted within a few days of each other in late December!  This is my adult female Ruby's twelfth moult since I first bought her as a juvenile in the Autumn of 2006, it seems impossible to believe that I will have owned her for ten years by the end of September!  Here are pictures of the moulted exoskeletons (exuivae) of Ruby (right) and my much smaller juvenile of the species, which I bought just over a year ago:

Mexican red knee tarantula exuviae

No matter how many times I witness the moulting process (and this numbers into the hundreds within my tarantula collection and well into the thousands within my wider animal collection!) it never ceases to amaze me.  The pictures below show Ruby's exuvia with the carapace (head area) firstly in place and then two pictures where it is lifted upwards, revealing the hollowness of the 'old' legs through which tarantulas pull their new legs during the moulting process:

Mexican red knee tarantula exuvia
Mexican red knee tarantula exuvia
Mexican red knee tarantula exuvia

Here is how both tarantulas are looking now, the as-yet-unnamed juvenile in the first two pictures and Ruby in the final two!

Mexican red knee tarantula
Mexican red knee tarantula
Mexican red knee tarantula
Mexican red knee tarantula

The final news story of the new year is that one of my beautiful giant leaf insects (Phyllium giganteum) moulted successfully to the subadult stage just a couple of days ago.  She is absolutely gorgeous as you can see here, these really are one of the most remarkable (and one of my favourite) insect species in my collection:

Subadult Phyllium giganteum aka giant leaf insect
Subadult Phyllium giganteum aka giant leaf insect

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